Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Download PDFDownload PDF
Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Formstack
/
December 1, 2012
Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

MIN
/
December 1, 2012
About the Episode
Episode Highlights
Meet our Guest
Episode Transcript

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Get the Report

Not a valid e-mail address

Great, thank ya!

You can now access the content.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Blog

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Panelists
No items found.
Introduction
Introduction

Great, thank ya!

You can now access the content.
Download NowDownload Now
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Panelists
No items found.
Infographic

Embed Images in Word DOCX

Follow these quick and easy steps to start embedding images automatically into your Word DOCX.
Download InfographicDownload Infographic

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Collecting payments with online forms is easy, but first, you have to choose the right payment gateway. Browse the providers in our gateway credit card processing comparison chart to find the best option for your business. Then sign up for Formstack Forms, customize your payment forms, and start collecting profits in minutes.

Online Payment Gateway Comparison Chart

NOTE: These amounts reflect the monthly subscription for the payment provider. Formstack does not charge a fee to integrate with any of our payment partners.

FEATURES
Authorize.Net
Bambora
Chargify
First Data
PayPal
PayPal Pro
PayPal Payflow
Stripe
WePay
ProPay
Monthly Fees
$25
$25
$149+
Contact First Data
$0
$25
$0-$25
$0
$0
$4
Transaction Fees
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
N/A
Contact First Data
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
10¢
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.9% + 30¢
$2.6% + 30¢
Countries
5
8
Based on payment gateway
50+
203
3
4
25
USA
USA
Currencies
11
2
23
140
25
23
25
135+
1
1
Card Types
6
13
Based on payment gateway
5
9
9
5
6
4
4
Limits
None
None
Based on payment gateway
None
$10,000
None
None
None
None
$500 per transaction
Form Payments
Recurring Billing
Mobile Payments
PSD2 Compliant

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Due to the way Word DOCX files are designed, embedding dynamic images in a Word document is not as simple as when you are using our Builder. But, it is still possible with a little bit of work. Below is a quick tutorial on how you can embed a dynamic image (signature, uploaded picture, etc) into your DOCX documents. For this example, we will be embedding a Formstack signature in our DOCX.

First thing you will need to do is embed an image in your document as placeholder for where you want the final image to go. The size that you make this image placeholder will be the size that the final image will be. It is important to note that you must use a placeholder with the same file format (JPG or PNG) as the final image.

If you do not have an image placeholder to use, we have built an image generator that you can use. Here is an example URL:

http://www.webmerge.me/images/image.php?width=300&height=100&type=png

If you go to that URL, it will load an image. Simply right-click the image and copy the image, then paste that image into your word document. In the URL, you will notice there is width and height setting so you can control the size of the image.Â

Also, the type parameter (possible values: png or jpeg) controls the type of the image. Go ahead and change those parameters to create a customized image.
Â


The next step is the setup the variable placeholder for your image. You can put this placeholder anywhere in your document – it is simply used to map the image URL to the image element in your document. For the most part, it’s the same format as other variables, but we will add a little more info. Below is an example variable placeholder for the image:

{$MyImage|image:1:png}

In the above example, the variable name is “MyImage”, then the “|” indicates options after. Each image in a DOCX is stored using a numerical identifier, so the “1” in the image indicates that identifier. Determining the image number may take some trial and error if you are using images in header or footers – the numbering scheme seems to be inconsistent in that case. The “png” in the placeholder represents the image type (possible values: png, jpg, or jpeg).

Once you have that in place, you’re all set!
Â

Formstack
Formstack is a SaaS company with a mission to help organizations digitize what matters, automate workflows, and fix processes—all without code. A variety of team members come together to compile posts under Formstack's authorship.
More Articles
Meet The Host
Content Marketing Manager
Connect
Lindsay is a writer with a background in journalism and loves getting to flex her interview skills as host of Practically Genius. She manages Formstack's blog and long-form reports, like the 2022 State of Digital Maturity: Advancing Workflow Automation.